I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

TODAY IN NETWORK AWESOME MAGAZINE


by Chrisaphenia Danai Papagrigoriou
July 20, 2017

In order to fully comprehend Christoph Doering’s “3302” as a piece as well as a (oh yeah) narrative movie, we want to get inside this particular cab he drives through Berlin, so let's take a time machine to the early 80’s. 

It’s 1979 in Berlin. The wall is proudly up and the youth proudly scatter in whatever direction they want. If “no future” is actually a point in time, this is it. Not decisively against everyone and everything but rather narcissistically hedonistic...

Chrisaphenia Danai Papagrigoriou

by Thomas Michalski
July 20, 2017
Watching an Otis Redding performance is like witnessing a force of nature, as if he’s channeling directly that very powerful, ineffable thing that gives soul music its name. The voice that pours out of him doesn’t describe an emotion, it is an emotion, a raw transference of yearning loneliness or excited passion, whatever the song calls for. It’s so organic, so unfettered, like a man possessed, that it hides another aspect of Redding’s live show, which is that a lot of thought and preparation and work went into it. It’s not contrived by any means, the feeling in he brought to the stage is 100% real, it’s palpable in every breath and every jerky movement, but it took years of consciously honing his craft to be able translate it to an audience in a way that they could understand...
Thomas Michalski is a writer and radio host from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. You can keep up with his comings and goings over at http://www.voodooinspector.com/

by Thomas Michalski
July 11, 2017

The nice thing about writing for Network Awesome, which is a volunteer gig by the way, is that there’s literally no direction or instruction, meaning more or less complete freedom on my part. That means that when I start researching some deranged piece of video that’s recently landed in my inbox, and I’ve requested that they only send me their most far-out, left-field stuff , I can follow the tangent that interests me most, though how you’ll feel about it I never can tell. Today’s subject, Three Plays by Gertrude Stein, is a good example. Certainly the life of the pioneering writer and intellectual is fascinating enough, and these three productions of her abstract stage works by Dutch graphic designer Jaap Drupsteen, which feel something like watching Pee-Wee’s Playhouse on bad acid (when the dancing dog woman stars licking the prism people it’s really…something), definitely invite the kind of misguided deciphering that could easily fill this space in a reasonably entertaining and informative manner, but I wanted to know more about something else. If this was, as it appears to be, a “television special”, who exactly was putting this kind of crazy shit on the air? As it turns out, it was PBS, and they were doing it once a week for over a decade...

Thomas Michalski is a writer and radio host from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. You can keep up with his comings and goings over at http://www.voodooinspector.com/

by Tom Keiser
July 8, 2017

William Girdler was one of the kings of 1970’s exploitation films. His films varied widely, from natural disaster films, such asThe Day of the Animals and Grizzly, to paranormal movies, such as The Manitou, and even blaxploitation films such as the Pam Grier vehicle Sheba, Baby. Girdler died in a helicopter crash in 1978 at the age of thirty, cutting short a career that included several hits and more than a few near-misses.

Perhaps the biggest of Girdler’s near-misses was 1974’s Abby, starring Carol Speed, William Marshall, Austin Stoker, and Academy Award nominee Juanita Moore. Riding the coattails of William Friedkin’s 1973 blockbuster The ExorcistAbby details the possession of the title character and her exorcism...

Tom Keiser has written for Network Awesome Magazine, The Awl, and the United Football League website.  He lives in New Jersey, and has a Twitter and a Tumblr.

by A Wolfe
July 8, 2017
When Something Weird released José Mojica Marins’ catalogue of psychedelic “Mouth of Garbage” Brazilian horror flicks, US audiences fell in love with Coffin Joe, the so-bad-he’s-good undertaker character Marins plays in almost all of his films. Even in the UK, the goth-pop band The Horrors has a member who’s renamed himself Coffin Joe in honor of Marins’ character, who didn’t get his Anglicized name until the 90s, when Europeans got into bizarro cinema...
A Wolfe is a writer and director in Los Angeles. awolfeswolfworld.wordpress.com