I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

TODAY IN NETWORK AWESOME MAGAZINE


by Brian Correia
Oct. 31, 2014

These days, it seems like anytime someone says anything about Tim Burton, it has to be along the lines of “Oh, how the mighty have fallen,” or even, in some especially wrong cases, “Oh, how the mighty were never even mighty in the first place.1 ” Sure, maybe the man has been resting on his laurels for a few years, but he’s got hell of a set of laurels. And shtick aside, there is no fronting on his resume. Here’s a taste: he has animated for Disney, dreamed up dozens of iconic characters, invented the dark superhero film, directed bonafide classics in a Whitman’s sampler of genres, and had two children with Marla Singer from Fight Club.

Believe it or not, that long and storied career had one of its earliest highlights in 1984 with a short film calledFrankenweenie. At heart, Frankenweenie is a classic tale about a boy and his dog. Of course, given the title, you would be right to suspect there’s a little more at stake here than that. It’s an homage to the memory of James Whale’s UniversalFrankenstein films, from the sprawling score to the dramatic angles to the plot, in which the boy reanimates Sparky, his punnily named bull terrier...

Brian Correia is a budding computer scientist and aspiring writer from Boston, Massachusetts who couldn't decide which hip-hop lyric to put in his byline. The top three, in no particular order, were as follows: “cooler than a cucumber in a bowl of hot sauce,” “spiced out Calvin Coolidge loungin' with six duelers,” and “I got techniques drippin' out my buttcheeks.” He is on Twitter (@brianmcorreia) and Tumblr (brianmcorreia.tumblr.com) like the rest of the kids.

by Brian Correia
Oct. 28, 2014
Being an American Geek, I know the ins and outs of American pop culture like I know the ins and outs of the back of Luke Skywalker’s prosthetic hand. Which is fine, except that most of the time I’m ignoring gigantic chunks of culture from other countries. In lieu of taking the time to delve into the cinematic worlds of countries like, say, France, Russia, and Japan, I have developed a sort of pop culture shorthand -- a series of associations that might impress at pub trivia but certainly wouldn’t knock anybody out here at Network Awesome. France has Godard. Russia, whose manifold contributions to cinema I have managed to boil down to one film, I associate with Battleship Potemkin. Japan’s is Kurosawa (and you know I first heard about him from the Barenaked Ladies1. Shameful)...
Brian Correia is a budding computer scientist and aspiring writer from Boston, Massachusetts who couldn't decide which hip-hop lyric to put in his byline. The top three, in no particular order, were as follows: “cooler than a cucumber in a bowl of hot sauce,” “spiced out Calvin Coolidge loungin' with six duelers,” and “I got techniques drippin' out my buttcheeks.” He is on Twitter (@brianmcorreia) and Tumblr (brianmcorreia.tumblr.com) like the rest of the kids.

by Jake Goldman
Oct. 26, 2014

Not long ago, I attended an exhibit featuring the work of comic book artists from the 40s, 50s and 60s.  Not knowing a whole lot about comic books, I found myself awestruck at the wall-sized prints depicting Captain America beating down a gaggle of Nazi soldiers.  Captain America first appeared in 1941 by Timely Comics (who would later become what we now know as Marvel) [1] as an over-the-top tool of propaganda.  In fact, in that very issue, you will find Captain America socking der Fuhrer right in the kisser. 

Of course, comic book artists weren’t the only folks using their medium as an exploitative platform.  Disney famously made Der Fuehrer’s Face in 1942, an anti-Nazi propaganda film starring Donald Duck which won an Oscar [and which you can watch on Network Awesome - ed.] [2]  Still, not everyone could afford a trip to the theater and not every household owned a television.  Comic books, for that reason, had a somewhat larger pull than the more advanced mediums of the time. And even more, they knew exactly who they were reaching out to: the future of America.  Future soldiers.  Future leaders. The young men who would want to suit up for the red, white and blue were the ones holding those thin pages, staining their fingers black.

Jake Goldman is a writer and a teacher. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.  Occasionally he writes songs.  If you are so inclined, check out Internetdogfist.com for words and Otsego.Bandcamp.com for music.


by Susan Cohen
Oct. 25, 2014

You shouldn’t read this essay if you haven’t seen the ending of Sleepaway Camp, because you can’t talk about Sleepaway Camp without talking about its ending. In a lot of ways, the movie as a whole is pretty formulaic, taking advantage of all the horror tropes: Horny teens unleash their hormones at a summer camp. Someone gets bullied, and someone gets revenge on his or her behalf. All the most sexually active or aggressive characters, who also happen to be the bullies, are brutally murdered.

None of those things contributed to why Sleepaway Camp so notorious within horror-purist circles. But the movie isn’t popular because it’s any good. It’s popular because the last two minutes of the film are so bat-shit crazy...

Susan Cohen decided to leave her career in journalism to go back to school — for journalism. She's still not sure if she made a mistake. Visit susanjcohen.com to learn more about her. 


by Zack Kotzer
Oct. 23, 2014
“My dear Moebius,” wrote Federico Fellini in a fan letter to the poignant comic artist, “Everything that you do pleases me; even your name pleases me” (1). Fellini goes on to praise Jean “Moebius” Giraud’s abilities as a creator, reminisce of his joyous first encounter with Metal Hurlant (which Giraud helped to found, and which would become known in English as Heavy Metal), and suggests Giraud try his hand at film (though he does not directly suggest they collaborate on it). “I would never call upon you because you are too complete, your visionary strength is too formidable. What would there be left for me to do?” 

Moebius would never direct a film himself (the closest being a collaboration with Fantastic Planet helm René Laloux, which was entitled Time Masters). Still, his presence in film, if not all incarnations of genre, is important, if not irreplaceable. Directly, he influenced...

Zack Kotzer is a writer, editor, ghoul and ex-carnie living in his hometown of Toronto. As of now he has contributed to the Torontoist, The Onion AV Club, the SPACE Channel, Sharp Magazine, Dork Shelf and is the associate editor and Toronto head of Steel Bananas. Right now Zack is looking to see what it takes to start a print magazine because he is as dedicated as he is naive. Is that what deluded means? No wait never mind, don't answer that. @KingFranknstein