I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

TODAY IN NETWORK AWESOME MAGAZINE


by Anthony Galli
April 23, 2016

Memory Vague is the sound of the future lamenting its past.

Possibilities thwarted, opportunities squandered, potential wasted, connections missed.

Or…Memory Vague is the sound of the past mourning its future. A last look at all those things that never are meant to be.

Memory Vague bypasses the present altogether, constructing its identity with ghosts and fragments from glimpses of another age. It hints that it may launch into an unexpected celebration at any time, but reconsiders its position and, instead, mulls over its former glories and failures...

Anthony Galli currently lives in Athens, Georgia. He shares a birthday with his black cat, Magic, and they both claim Wings of Desire as their favorite film. Anthony has published two books of poetry, Amnesia for Insomniacs and Invisible Idiot.


by Chris Martin
April 18, 2016

Graphic design as an art form rests on a very precarious ledge between form and function. To lean too far to either side of this theoretic fulcrum defeats its purpose. This balancing act makes the immense and accomplished work of Tadanori Yokoo that much more impressive, as he is able to have immense success in design as a satisfactory product to his client but also genuinely express himself and push the boundaries of visual expression...

Christopher Martin recently graduated from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst with a degree in English and a specialization in Film Studies. Shockingly, he is currently underemployed. In his free time Chris likes to read old science fiction novels, enjoy what little nightlife Western Massachusetts has to offer, and watch as many films as possible. He also spends too much time on Tumblr.

by Cory Gross
April 18, 2016

The name of Kenzo Masaoka is practically synonymous with the early development of Japanese animation. Born in Osaka in 1898, the same year that Japan's first movies were produced, he rose to ascendancy in the 1930's. Amongst his accomplishments are the introduction of cell animation to Japan and the release of the first Japanese animated talkie,Chikara to Onna no Yo no Naka in 1933.

Now sadly a lost film, “Within the World of Power and Women” broke with tradition in certain critical ways. First of all it utilized sound, dispensing with the role of the benshi (live film narrator of the silent era) in direct follow-up to the first Japanese talkie film Madame and the Courtesan in 1931. Well-known actors and actresses were hired to voice the parts, including Ranko Sawa of the Takarazuka Kagekidan...

For Cory Gross, the past is a lifestyle choice. Native to the ranchlands of Western Canada, he works as a museums and heritage professional in Calgary, Alberta, teaching science, nature, history and art. He also volunteers with a number of science and history organizations in the city, holds a graduate degree in theology, and enjoys travelling at home and abroad. His love of Victorian science fiction and antiquated adventure stories is on display at his blog Voyages Extraordinaires: Scientific Romances in a Bygone Age


by Cory Gross
April 18, 2016

It goes without saying, and most often does, that losing a war is a terrifying experience. For Japan, the surrender that closed World War II was a humiliating experience with profound social and collective psychological issues in addition to the damage to infrastructure and loss of life. Most infamous are the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, yet these only accomplished in one swoop what repeated firebombings of other Japanese cities had done over months. Over half of Tokyo, Yokohama, and Kobe were destroyed with hundreds of thousands of civilians dead. Toyama was almost completely obliterated. About 35% of Osaka was destroyed and 65% of the ancient capital of Nara, but thankfully Kyoto was untouched. It was as if the recent earthquake and tsunami affecting the Sendai area happened over the entire country.

Its legacy impacted not merely Japan, but the whole world. Coupled with the firebombings of Germany, it launched the United States on a strategy of specifically targeting civilians that it still uses to this day. Within Japan, this level of destruction left childless parents and parentless children, extreme poverty and disease, mountains of corpses to bury, and homes to rebuild without the resources with which to rebuild them. American occupation forces took over, dominating and reorganizing nearly every aspect of Japanese life including a rewritten constitution...

For Cory Gross, the past is a lifestyle choice. Native to the ranchlands of Western Canada, he works as a museums and heritage professional in Calgary, Alberta, teaching science, nature, history and art. He also volunteers with a number of science and history organizations in the city, holds a graduate degree in theology, and enjoys travelling at home and abroad. His love of Victorian science fiction and antiquated adventure stories is on display at his blog Voyages Extraordinaires: Scientific Romances in a Bygone Age


by Jake Goldman
April 12, 2016

After watching the pilot episode for Best of Times, the 1981, hour-long, ABC-produced venture, it's not surprising the show wasn't picked up for series. The show isn't so god-awful and the acting is decent (though, many of the performances here seem to lean hard on theatrical training. In other words: these actors have yet to add "subtlety" to their repertoire). It seems that the show's fairly narrow scope (the plight of middle-class teens) and its unfortunate prime time slot (someone expected this to catch up to behemoths like Laverne and Shirley, The Love Boat and Dynasty?) is what did it in.

Though it's worth a watch if only for Crispin Glover and Nicolas Cage's performances (Nic is credited here as Nicolas Coppola). Glover proves to be a fairly capable narrator, often breaking the fourth wall to speak directly to an audience uneducated on all things teenage. Cage, on the other hand, manages to inject his standard combination of intensity and creepiness into his role as the slow-witted, beefcake jock.   

 

Jake Goldman is a writer and a teacher. He lives in New Haven, Connecticut.  Occasionally he writes songs.  If you are so inclined, check out Internetdogfist.com for words and Otsego.Bandcamp.com for music.