I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

TODAY IN NETWORK AWESOME MAGAZINE


by Susan Cohen
March 30, 2015
I hate Lena Dunham in the way that all modern 20-something females of a certain smart, creative ilk hate her: Because she did it first. She made it possible for (mostly) realistic portrayals of modern 20-something females of a certain smart, creative ilk (and, unfortunately, of a certain economic class and ethnic background) to become relevant on a wider cultural scale. There wasn’t really a movie quite like Tiny Furniture before Lena Dunham came around, and there hasn’t been one made like it since then — at least not one that has seen the same amount of success...

Susan Cohen decided to leave her career in journalism to go back to school — for journalism. She's still not sure if she made a mistake. Visit susanjcohen.com to learn more about her. 


by Anthony Galli
March 30, 2015
Ugawood is the next big thing happening in the film world, yet it probably won’t be coming soon to a theater near you in the near future, even if you live in Uganda. Ugawood is the nickname that Ugandan filmmakers have lovingly attached to their movement, hoping its work will soon find a place beside its Nollywood neighbors (Nigeria), Bollywood extravaganzas (India), and, of course, Hollywood blockbusters...

Anthony Galli currently lives in Athens, Georgia. He shares a birthday with his black cat, Magic, and they both claim Wings of Desire as their favorite film. Anthony has published two books of poetry, Amnesia for Insomniacs and Invisible Idiot.


by Casey Dewey
March 29, 2015

William Shakespeare (or if you’re a literary conspiracy theorist, Christopher Marlowe or Francis Bacon), would have been pretty fly for a white guy in a pair of Jenco jeans, ski goggles, and a pacifier around his neck. He could have traded in those dusty tomes and quills for a pair of Technics, a mixer, a sweet sound system, a trippy lighting rig and spread his message of Peace, Love, Unity and Respect (P.L.U.R) from Verona to Elsinore. Nothing would have been rotten in Denmark with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern doling out Special K and Ecstasy to the gathering crowds. Shakespeare would have loved club kid fool Michael Alig and his superior Peter Gatien, the King Lear of New York. Just roll with me on this one...

Casey Dewey resides in Tucson, Arizona. He's a film writer for the Tucson Weekly and host of "Deep Red Radio" , a radio show dedicated to film soundtracks on 91.3 KXCI FM. He enjoys tacos, cervezas and garlic in everything. He wakes up every morning to a fresh pot of black coffee and at least two hours of Dragnet on TV.

by Nicholas Shapiro
March 24, 2015
Before Sunrise, above all things considered, is a love letter. It’s a love letter addressed to those who keep romanticized ideals of that four letter word at heart’s length. It restores hope to the hopeless romantics who believe the golden age of love was but a half century ago. A modern love story for modern lovers, Before Sunrise is Richard Linklater’s intoxicating, dialogue-driven romance that transcends sentimentality in favor of something more believable, something with soul and something contemporary despite being released nearly 20 years ago...
My name is Nicholas Craig Shapiro, I'm 22 from New York, New York and I just graduated from SUNY Purchase. I'm currently a janitor/pool attendant/freelance writer/single woman trying really hard to keep busy for on the off chance that I'm not, I will get bored and explode into glitter. I maintain a twitter and that's about it https://twitter.com/glennfeathers

by Anthony Galli
March 23, 2015

Deep in the heart of darkness, or at least in some secluded lair in a Philippine jungle, mad scientist Dr. Gordon, with his blank faced and slightly daft but beautiful daughter Neva, is preparing a mutant race of “super-beings,” creatures genetically modified to survive the coming ecological apocalypse. He really believes this.

In the meantime, deadpan hotshot, and all around white guy, Matt Farrell is kidnapped while scuba diving in the pristine waters near Dr. Gordon’s hideaway. Apparently, Farrell’s DNA is of superior quality, and is just what the doctor needs to bring his plan of a man/animal (manimal, if you will) hybrid super-race to successful fruition. Naturally, hilarity ensues as Dr. Gordon, Matt Farrell, and Steinman, an ambiguously sexual one-named Neo-Nazi throwback with unreliable hair, match wits for dominance in this New Zoological Eden...

Anthony Galli currently lives in Athens, Georgia. He shares a birthday with his black cat, Magic, and they both claim Wings of Desire as their favorite film. Anthony has published two books of poetry, Amnesia for Insomniacs and Invisible Idiot.