I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. - Groucho Marx

TODAY IN NETWORK AWESOME MAGAZINE


by Thomas Michalski
Nov. 25, 2014
As home video became more or less ubiquitous during the late 1980s and early 90s, the music industry, never known to pass up an opportunity for profit, scrambled to cash in on the trend, but never truly figured out what to do with the format. Record labels attempted just about everything, from ambitious, conceptual video albums and concert films, which proved time consuming and expensive to produce, to simple repackaging of the clips already airing on MTV, oftentimes juiced with a bit of behind-the-scenes footage, which didn’t always prove that enticing to consumers, especially given the relatively high price of VHS. They no doubt still made a bundle in the process, but eventually realized the video market would never generate the same revenue as their traditional music mediums, and since then haven’t put much effort into reissuing all that material, save for a few classics, leaving a lot of interesting odds and ends out of print and widely unavailable until some generous soul finally rips them to YouTube, as was the case with A Tribe Called Quest’s killer The Art of Moving Butts in Europe, which captures the seminal rap group at an incredible tipping point in their colorful career...
Thomas Michalski is a writer and radio host from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. You can keep up with his comings and goings over at http://www.voodooinspector.com/

by Thomas Michalski
Nov. 25, 2014
As home video became more or less ubiquitous during the late 1980s and early 90s, the music industry, never known to pass up an opportunity for profit, scrambled to cash in on the trend, but never truly figured out what to do with the format. Record labels attempted just about everything, from ambitious, conceptual video albums and concert films, which proved time consuming and expensive to produce, to simple repackaging of the clips already airing on MTV, oftentimes juiced with a bit of behind-the-scenes footage, which didn’t always prove that enticing to consumers, especially given the relatively high price of VHS. They no doubt still made a bundle in the process, but eventually realized the video market would never generate the same revenue as their traditional music mediums, and since then haven’t put much effort into reissuing all that material, save for a few classics, leaving a lot of interesting odds and ends out of print and widely unavailable until some generous soul finally rips them to YouTube, as was the case with A Tribe Called Quest’s killer The Art of Moving Butts in Europe, which captures the seminal rap group at an incredible tipping point in their colorful career...
Thomas Michalski is a writer and radio host from Milwaukee, Wisconsin. You can keep up with his comings and goings over at http://www.voodooinspector.com/

by Susan Cohen
Nov. 24, 2014
Hard Rock Zombies is just one movie in a long line of terrible movies whose titles just tell it like it is, like Redneck Zombies or Teenage Zombies or pretty much any movies with “Zombies” in the title. In this case, it’s easy to guess that zombies will be involved, and, chances are, they are going to rock hard. That’s what sets this one it apart from other “Zombie” movies...

Susan Cohen decided to leave her career in journalism to go back to school — for journalism. She's still not sure if she made a mistake. Visit susanjcohen.com to learn more about her. 


by Anthony Galli
Nov. 21, 2014

Memory Vague is the sound of the future lamenting its past.

Possibilities thwarted, opportunities squandered, potential wasted, connections missed.

Or…Memory Vague is the sound of the past mourning its future. A last look at all those things that never are meant to be.

Memory Vague bypasses the present altogether, constructing its identity with ghosts and fragments from glimpses of another age. It hints that it may launch into an unexpected celebration at any time, but reconsiders its position and, instead, mulls over its former glories and failures...

Anthony Galli currently lives in Athens, Georgia. He shares a birthday with his black cat, Magic, and they both claim Wings of Desire as their favorite film. Anthony has published two books of poetry, Amnesia for Insomniacs and Invisible Idiot.


by Cory Vielma
Nov. 21, 2014
The legendary German live-music TV show Beat Club ended its run on December 9, 1972. Newly christened as Musikladen, the show picked up exactly where it left off with its first episode running a mere four days later. All told, Musikladen would end up running 12 years, with its 90th (and final) episode appearing November 29, 1984. In its 12 years, an incredible number of performers would grace its stage, from the top acts of the day to bands whose only point of reference today is their appearance on the show. Together, Musikladen and Beat Club had a huge impact on how music is presented on television, not just in Germany but in the rest of the world. If you are old enough to remember the early days of MTV, think about how often they played clips labeled “Closet Classics”— a hefty chunk of those videos were actually just clips from Musikladen or Beat Club. This is also interesting because I would posit that MTV and the rise of the music video were at least partially responsible for the demise of Musikladen, but more on that later.

Early in Musikladen’s history it seemed that while the show was trying to keep going with what it had built as Beat Club, they had also made small changes to set it apart. Anyone familiar with (the later years of) Beat Club knows that they embraced emerging video effect technologies whole-heartedly and were by no means shy...

Cory Vielma is an American musician, photographer and occasional guy who strings words together, based in Berlin. Under the name The Sadnesses, he has released several records and has had the pleasure of writing for such great publications as SF WeeklyGreencine.com and Si Señor Journalism Compendium. His love of music and film runs so deep that it has permanently altered his DNA and given him the ability to smell time and taste rhumbas. Additionally, he is very fond of a good veggie burger with fries and a side of mustard.